Alan Kling M.D. - Dermatologist Dr. Alan Kling is a nationally renowned, board-certified dermatologist who practices both general and cosmetic dermatology. Dr. Kling is a recognized expert in the field of HPV (human papillomavirus) infections and is active in teaching, research, and the evaluation and treatment of patients with this condition.
1000 Park Avenue New York, NY 10028
NEW YORK, 1000 Park Avenue New York 10028 New York
Alan Kling M.D. - Dermatologist
Dr. Alan Kling is a nationally renowned, board-certified dermatologist who practices both general and cosmetic dermatology. Dr. Kling is a recognized expert in the field of HPV (human papillomavirus) infections and is active in teaching, research, and the evaluation and treatment of patients with this condition. Dr. Kling is an excellent doctor. He always takes the time to answer questions and cares about his patients, which is very unusual these days. His staff are very nice and waiting time is minimal. I've been to Dr. Kling 3-4 times now. Each time, I was seen promptly and Dr. Kling was thorough in his analysis and objective in treatment. Prognosis and treatments were explained in plain, easy-to-understand English. Office is very clean. Recommended. Dr. Kling is great. I have been seeing him for over a year and every visit has been helpful and a pleasent experience. I will continue to see Dr Kling going forward. Dr. Kling was mean at first but i continue to see him. In retropect, he wasnt being mean, he was being a doctor. In todays society we are quick to judge without thought. Thats why we usually feel regret. This doctor put me in my place and he needed too. I usually ignore followups but one thing Dr. Kling does is shows he cares. This man is very busy but very kind and commpassionate as he never makes you feel your alone. Gives you personal stories too relate and in 6 months ive kept all my appointments. Although i dont want to be in this position, Dr. Kling makes the process fun. Thank You. Dr. Kling is a terrific doctor. He treated my condition with expertise and accuracy, and my skin problem was resolved within a few days. I was really nervous when I first came to see him, but he quickly allayed my concerns and put me at ease by explaining the reasons for my rash and how he was going to treat it. He was kind, compassionate and I felt he fully understood why I was so scared. Dr. Kling's staff was very friendly and reminded me of my appointment day and time two days in advance. The office was elogant yet welcoming. I would highly recommend Dr. Kling to my family and friends. Excellent dr explained everything in detail. Highly recommend. The Dr. Arten was very helpful he took care of my situation. I would reommend this place for any one that has a skin problem. His staff was great as well nice and kind people. They took care of me very quick. Dr. Kling is an excellent physician whom I recommend for treating any dermatological ailment. He was very diligent in helping me obtain relief in a moment in which my disease was severely affecting my health and well being. His staff was also superb, very polite and like the Dr. Kling showed a high level of professional when interacting with me and assisting in the medical procedures that I required. They are the best!! Doctor Kling is wonderful. I am extremely happy with my results and would definitely recomend him to family and friends. I have been a patient for over 20 years. The best doctor Excellent physician! I love how my skin looks! Efficient and takes time to explain process amd symptoms. Very thorough and clear. Good experience. Dr. Kling is very knowledgeable and understands my needs. He explains what is doing and why, and a brief history of my condition. I would recommend him highly. Dr Kling is an excellent doctor, very professional and kind. His stuff is great, friendly and efficient. Dr.Kling is the is the best dermatologist i have been to the pimples on my face was aweful.Now i am happy with the result. i would recomemd him to anyone who has a problem with there skin. thank you Dr. Kling to let me feel good about myself again. I have been a patient of Dr. Kling for over two years and can give an unqualified recommendation of his care and services. He is a very focused and professional physician. His office staff is also highly competent and easy to work with. Additionally, I have found dr. Kling's availability to be very good. Dr. Alan Kling is an outstanding Dermatologist. I have been seeing him over 10 years. His office staff is excellent. He is available at all times if you have any emergency call. He is one of the top physician in his area of expertise. I am happy to share my good experience in this rating/review. Dr. Alan kling is one of the finest physicians in manhattan. Courteous, professional and caring. Michael hirsch Dr Kling has been my attending physician for many years now. His professionalism and "bedside manner" has helped me through many challenges. I highly recommend Dr Kling and his wonderful friendly, efficient staff to anyone who may need the services he provides. Dr Kling has been my attending physician for many years now. His professionalism and "bedside manner" has helped me through many challenges. I highly recommend Dr Kling and his wonderful friendly, efficient staff to anyone who may need the services he provides. Dr. Kling is an exceptiionally skilled and knows his field. His stlye is comforting and reassuring. All of this is reflected in his staff which is personable and professional. I will recommend him without hesitation. Dr. kling is very thorough and knowledgeable. I trust him and have high respect for his services. Dr. Kling is the best dermathologist I ever have. I have being his patient for over 15 years and I am always very satisfied for the service I receive from him. I highly recommend Dr. Kling to all my friends. Dr. Kling has been my doctor for a long time. He is very helpful . I am satisfied with his services. Dr. cling was very accomadating and made a uncomfortable visit to the office very relaxed. I felt very welcomed and it was a not nearly as bad as i originally anticpated. I d strongly recomend Dr Cling to anyone with any dermatogogy concerns or issues. Dr. Kling is phenomenal! He is extremely knowledgable and effective. I recommend him to all of my friends & family. Over the last year my skin has made a great improvement and it is all thanks to Dr. Kling.
Rating: 4 / 5 stars

Molluscum Contagiosum

Molluscum contagiosum is an infection caused by a poxvirus (molluscum contagiosum virus). The result of the infection is usually a benign, mild skin disease characterized by lesions (growths) that may appear anywhere on the body. Within 6-12 months, Molluscum contagiosum typically resolves without scarring but may take as long as 4 years.

The lesions, known as Mollusca, are small, raised, and usually white, pink, or flesh-colored with a dimple or pit in the center. They often have a pearly appearance. They’re usually smooth and firm. In most people, the lesions range from about the size of a pinhead to as large as a pencil eraser (2 to 5 millimeters in diameter). They may become itchy, sore, red, and/or swollen.

Mollusca may occur anywhere on the body including the face, neck, arms, legs, abdomen, and genital area, alone or in groups. The lesions are rarely found on the palms of the hands or the soles of the feet.

Transmission
The virus that causes molluscum spreads from direct person-to-person physical contact and through contaminated fomites. Fomites are inanimate objects that can become contaminated with virus; in the instance of molluscum contagiosum this can include linens such as clothing and towels, bathing sponges, pool equipment, and toys. Although the virus might be spread by sharing swimming pools, baths, saunas, or other wet and warm environments, this has not been proven. Researchers who have investigated this idea think it is more likely the virus is spread by sharing towels and other items around a pool or sauna than through water.

Someone with molluscum can spread it to other parts of their body by touching or scratching a lesion and then touching their body somewhere else. This is called autoinoculation. Shaving and electrolysis can also spread mollusca to other parts of the body.

Molluscum can spread from one person to another by sexual contact. Many, but not all, cases of molluscum in adults are caused by sexual contact.

Conflicting reports make it unclear whether the disease may be spread by simple contact with seemingly intact lesions or if the breaking of a lesion and the subsequent transferring of core material is necessary to spread the virus.

The molluscum contagiosum virus remains in the top layer of skin (epidermis) and does not circulate throughout the body; therefore, it cannot spread through coughing or sneezing.

Since the virus lives only in the top layer of skin, once the lesions are gone the virus is gone and you cannot spread it to others. Molluscum contagiosum is not like herpes viruses, which can remain dormant (“sleeping”) in your body for long periods and then reappear.

Who is at risk for infection?
Molluscum contagiosum is common enough that you should not be surprised if you see someone with it or if someone in your family becomes infected. Although not limited to children, it is most common in children 1 to 10 years of age.

People at increased risk for getting the disease include:

  • People with weakened immune systems (i.e., HIV-infected persons or persons being treated for cancer) are at higher risk for getting molluscum contagiosum. Their growths may look different, be larger, and be more difficult to treat.
  • Atopic dermatitis may also be a risk factor for getting molluscum contagiosum due to frequent breaks in the skin. People with this condition also may be more likely to spread molluscum contagiousm to other parts of their body for the same reason.
  • People who live in warm, humid climates where living conditions are crowded.

In addition, there is evidence that molluscum infections have been on the rise in the United States since 1966, but these infections are not routinely monitored because they are seldom serious and routinely disappear without treatment.

What are the treatment options?
Because molluscum contagiosum is self-limited in healthy individuals, treatment may be unnecessary. Nonetheless, issues such as lesion visibility, underlying atopic disease, and the desire to prevent transmission may prompt therapy.

Treatment for molluscum is usually recommended if lesions are in the genital area (on or near the penis, vulva, vagina, or anus). If lesions are found in this area it is a good idea to visit your healthcare provider as there is a possibility that you may have another disease spread by sexual contact.

Be aware that some treatments available through the internet may not be effective and may even be harmful.

Physical removal
Physical removal of lesions may include cryotherapy (freezing the lesion with liquid nitrogen), curettage (the piercing of the core and scraping of caseous or cheesy material), and laser therapy. These options are rapid and require a trained health care provider, may require local anesthesia, and can result in post-procedural pain, irritation, and scarring.

It is not a good idea to try and remove lesions or the fluid inside of lesions yourself. By removing lesions or lesion fluid by yourself you may unintentionally autoinoculate other parts of the body or risk spreading it to others. By scratching or scraping the skin you could cause a bacterial infection.

Oral therapy
Gradual removal of lesions may be achieved by oral therapy. This technique is often desirable for pediatric patients because it is generally less painful and may be performed by parents at home in a less threatening environment. Oral cimetidine has been used as an alternative treatment for small children who are either afraid of the pain associated with cryotherapy, curettage, and laser therapy or because the possibility of scarring is to be avoided. While cimetidine is safe, painless, and well tolerated, facial mollusca do not respond as well as lesions elsewhere on the body.

Topical therapy
Podophyllotoxin cream (0.5%) is reliable as a home therapy for men but is not recommended for pregnant women because of presumed toxicity to the fetus. Each lesion must be treated individually as the therapeutic effect is localized. Other options for topical therapy include iodine and salicylic acid, potassium hydroxide, tretinoin, cantharidin (a blistering agent usually applied in an office setting), and imiquimod (T cell modifier). These treatments must be prescribed by a healthcare professional.

Therapy for immunocompromised persons
Most therapies are effective in immunocompetent patients; however, patients with HIV/AIDS or other immunosuppressing conditions often do not respond to traditional treatments. In addition, these treatments are largely ineffective in achieving long-term control in HIV patients.

Low CD4 cell counts have been linked to widespread facial mollusca and therefore have become a marker for severe HIV disease. Thus far, therapies targeted at boosting the immune system have proven the most effective therapy for molluscum contagiosum in immunocompromised persons. In extreme cases, intralesional interferon has been used to treat facial lesions in these patients. However, the severe and unpleasant side effects of interferon, such as influenza-like symptoms, site tenderness, depression, and lethargy, make it a less-than-desirable treatment. Furthermore, interferon therapy proved most effective in otherwise healthy persons. Radiation therapy is also of little benefit.

How can I keep it from spreading?
The best way to avoid getting molluscum is by following good hygiene habits. Remember that the virus lives only in the skin and once the lesions are gone, the virus is gone and you cannot spread the virus to others.

Wash your hands
There are ways to prevent the spread of molluscum contagiosum. The best way is to follow good hygiene (cleanliness) habits. Keeping your hands clean is the best way to avoid molluscum infection, as well as many other infections. Hand washing removes germs that may have been picked up from other people or from surfaces that have germs on them.

Don’t scratch or pick at molluscum lesions
It is important not to touch, pick, or scratch skin that has lesions, that includes not only your own skin but anyone else’s. Picking and scratching can spread the virus to other parts of the body and makes it easier to spread the disease to other people too.

Keep molluscum lesions covered
It is important to keep the area with molluscum lesions clean and covered with clothing or a bandage so that others do not touch the lesions and become infected. Do remember to keep the affected skin clean and dry.

Any time there is no risk of others coming into contact with your skin, such as at night when you sleep, uncover the lesions to help keep your skin healthy.

Be careful during sports activities
Do not share towels, clothing, or other personal items.

People with molluscum should not take part in contact sports like wrestling, basketball, and football unless all lesions can be covered by clothing or bandages.

Activities that use shared gear like helmets, baseball gloves and balls should also be avoided unless all lesions can be covered.

Swimming should also be avoided unless all lesions can be covered by watertight bandages. Personal items such as towels, goggles, and swimsuits should not be shared. Other items and equipment such as kick boards and water toys should be used only when all lesions are covered by clothing or watertight bandages.

Other ways to avoid sharing your infection
Do not shave or have electrolysis on areas with lesions.

Don’t share personal items such as unwashed clothes, hair brushes, wrist watches, and bar soap with others.

If you have lesions on or near the penis, vulva, vagina, or anus, avoid sexual activities until you see a healthcare provider.

What are the long-term effects?
Recovery from one molluscum infection does not prevent future infections. Molluscum contagiosum is not like herpes viruses which can remain dormant (“sleeping”) in your body for long periods of time and then reappear. If you get new molluscum contagiosum lesions after you are cured, it means you have come in contact with an infected person or object again.

Complications
The lesions caused by molluscum are usually benign and resolve without scarring. However scratching at the lesion, or using scraping and scooping to remove the lesion, can cause scarring. For this reason, physically removing the lesion is not often recommended in otherwise healthy individuals.

The most common complication is a secondary infection caused by bacteria. Secondary infections may be a significant problem in immunocompromised patients, such as those with HIV/AIDS or those taking immunosuppressing drug therapies. In these cases, treatment to prevent further spread of the infection is recommended.

Our Locations

MANHATTAN OFFICE

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 New York, NY 10028

212-288-1300

BROOKLYN OFFICE

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 Brooklyn, NY 11217

718-636-0425
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